Microfinance Loan Project

Since 2014, we have been offering loans to our artisans and other members of the community to encourage livelihood projects. We conducted an evaluation at the end of the 5th loan cycle (each cycle lasts 6 months) to see how we were doing.
Here’s a snapshot of the results:

Stories From The Field
Joyce Tito Akello benefited from loans during each of the first 4 cycles. She used the money to stock her grocery store thus increasing sales and revenue. With the money raised over the two-year period she was able to buy a cow.
Joyce Tito Akello benefited from loans during each of the first 4 cycles. She used the money to stock her grocery store thus increasing sales and revenue. With the money raised over the two-year period she was able to buy a cow.
With a loan of $80 CAD, Akumu Rose bought a female goat (which soon after produced kids) and the equipment for distilling a local alcohol, which she then sold, earning app. $17 each month. She was happy that the equipment is a durable asset, guaranteeing her a steady income for the foreseeable future.
With a loan of $80 CAD, Akumu Rose bought a female goat (which soon after produced kids) and the equipment for distilling a local alcohol, which she then sold, earning app. $17 each month. She was happy that the equipment is a durable asset, guaranteeing her a steady income for the foreseeable future.
Akello Rose Odong, a 63 year old mother of six, has taken loans in multiple cycles. With her first loan she bought a goat which gave birth to a kid. She used her next loan to buy seeds for her simsim (sesame) garden and keep it weeded. She expects a good return from the harvest of the simsim.
Akello Rose Odong, a 63 year old mother of six, has taken loans in multiple cycles. With her first loan she bought a goat which gave birth to a kid. She used her next loan to buy seeds for her simsim (sesame) garden and keep it weeded. She expects a good return from the harvest of the simsim.
Acaa Margret used her $110 CAD loan to buy a silo grain storage to store her crops after harvest, to rent a plot of land to plant groundnuts, and to buy more sweet bananas which she sells from home.
Acaa Margret used her $110 CAD loan to buy a silo grain storage to store her crops after harvest, to rent a plot of land to plant groundnuts, and to buy more sweet bananas which she sells from home.
  • “With BOA I can now provide the basic necessities to my family and even take my children to school without much support from my husband”

    Acaa Margret
  • “With a loan of 100,000 UGX (~$40 CAD), I rented a plot of land and bought groundnut seeds to plant.
    From this field I expect about 5 bags of groundnuts, each selling for 75,000 UGX (~$30 CAD).”

    Adyero Alice
  • “I used part of my 200,000 UGX ( ~$80 CAD)  loan to buy a pair of piglets, a male and female.
    We expect them to reproduce in six months, bringing us another six to seven piglets.”

    Adong Alice

Bead and Fabric Purchases

Since 2009 we have been supporting groups of artisans in and around Gulu though our purchases. Meet our artisans.

Lacan-Kwite

Lacan Kwite

  • Formed in 2005 in an Internally Displaced Persons camp, this group has grown from 5 members to 30 today (90% women)
  • They first came together to find markets for their products, facilitate external partnerships, and strengthen community
  • We have been working with them since 2012
  • Group members have listed the main benefits of BOA's support as: increased income, improved ability to pay their children's school fees and provide food for their families, owning livestock and starting small businesses
Can-Deg-Nyeko

Can Deg Nyeko

  • Formed in 2006 as the LRA insurgency was ending; today they have 19 members (95% women)
  • They first came together to acquire new skills, search for new markets, become eligible for government support and bring unity among members
  • We have been working with them since 2011
  • Group members have listed the main benefits of BOA's support as: higher monthly income resulting from the loan project and increased ability to pay rent and school fees for their children

Development Projects

Find out more about the local development projects we’ve supported on our homepage, but here’s the impact at a glance:

literacy
women
savings
uniforms
school roof
skills
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